Adams Scrap Recycling

Time to say goodbye to your old scrap?

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About Us

Adams Scrap Recycling is proud to be your recycling facility. Our goal is greater sustainability for our community. Through research and education we are able to provide our community with an opportunity for growth through recycling. Our global network of partners provides the highest recovery values for our clients’ materials.

Whether it’s your old pickup truck, the laptop that gave up on you, or just your old soda cans, keep it out of our landfills, bring it to Adams. We are here for you.

Click to witness what we mean by responsible recycling

DescriptionPriceUnit
Cars$5.00 per100 lbs
Shredder Steel$4.50 per100 lbs
Clean Auto Cast$4.25 per100 lbs
Clean #1 Steel$4.75 per100 lbs
Copper #1$2.36 per1 lbs
Copper #2$2.24 per1 lbs
Insulated Copper #1$1.54 per1 lbs
Insulated Copper #2$0.60 per1 lbs
Communication Coax$0.04 per1 lbs
Communication Cat 5 or 6$0.20 per1 lbs
String Lights$0.07 per1 lbs
Bare Bright$2.45 per1 lbs
UBCs$0.32 per1 lbs
Yellow Brass$1.30 per1 lbs
Red Brass$1.10 per1 lbs
95% Red$0.85 per1 lbs
Plumber's Brass$0.45 per1 lbs
Brass Breakage$0.07 per1 lbs
Brass Radiators$1.00 per1 lbs
Cu/AI Radiators$0.96 per1 lbs
Cu/AI Unclean$0.82 per1 lbs
Clean Old Sheet Aluminum$0.281 lbs
Light Old Sheet Aluminum$0.23 per1 lbs
Heavy Old Sheet Aluminum$0.06 per1 lbs
Electric Motors$0.10 per1 lbs
Batteries$0.17 per1 lbs
Stainless (Clean)$0.23 per1 lbs
Sealed Units$0.07 per1 lbs

What We Buy

Automobiles

Automobiles

Engines

Engines

Scrap Steel

Scrap Steel

Transmissions

Transmissions

Copper

Copper

Aluminum

Aluminum

Wire

Wire

Cast Iron

Cast Iron

Brass

Brass

Nickel

Nickel

Stainless Steel

Stainless Steel

Tungsten

Tungsten

Computers

Computers

LCD Monitors

LCD Monitors

Ballasts

Ballasts

Memory

Memory

Hard Drives

Hard Drives

Hastelloy

Hastelloy

Inconel

Inconel

Batteries

Batteries

Laptops

Laptops

Cell Phones

Cell Phones

Alternators

Alternators

Starters

Starters

Processors

Processors

Gold

Gold

Silver

Silver

Titanium

Titanium

Palladium

Palladium

Platinum

Platinum

Trucks

Trucks

Old Equpiment

Old Equpiment

Anything that can be recycled!

Recycling Facts

  • Each year, North America recycles more steel than plastic combined.
  • Americans use 100 million steel cans every day.
  • The steel industry has been recycling for over 150 years.
  • The steel industry’s largest source of raw material is scrap metal, which is commonly collected by recycling steel.
  • Recycling steel saves 75 percent of the energy that would be used to create steel from raw materials, enough to power 18 million homes.
  • Over 65 percent of the steel produced in the U.S. is recycled into new steel every year.
  • One ton of recycled steel saves 2,500 pounds of iron ore, 1,400 pounds of coal and 120 pounds of limestone.
  • A steel frame for a 2,000 square foot, two-story house is equivalent to the material of about six recycled cars; a comparable wooden frame would take over 40 trees to produce.
  • A typical household appliance (also known as a “white good”) is produced using approximately 65 percent steel.
  • The copper on that penny maybe as old as the pharaohs, because copper has an infinite recyclable life. Copper, by itself or in any of its alloys, such as brass or bronze, is used over and over again. Copper was first used by humans more than 10,000 years ago. A copper pendant discovered in what is now northern Iraq has been dated about 8700 B.C.
  • Known worldwide copper resources are estimated at nearly 5.8 trillion pounds of which only about 0.7 trillion pounds (12%) have been mined throughout history… and nearly all of that is still in circulation, because copper’s recycling rate is higher than that of any other engineering metal.
  • Each year in the U.S.A., nearly as much copper is recovered from recycled material as is derived from newly mined ore… and when you exclude wire production, most of which uses newly refined copper, the amount of copper used by copper and brass mills, ingot makers, foundries, powder plants and other industries shows that nearly three-fourths (72%) comes from recycled copper scrap.
  • More then half of this scrap is “new” scrap, such as chips and turnings from screw machine production… the remainder is “old” scrap, such as discarded electric cable, junked automobile radiators or even ancient Egyptian plumbing.
  • Copper’s recycling value is so great that premium-grade scrap normally has at least 95% of the value of the primary metal from newly mined ore.
  • About 65 % of America’s aluminum is currently recycled.
  • Every minute an average of 123,097 aluminum cans are recycled. On average, Americans recycle 2 out of every 3 aluminum cans they use.
  • The average aluminum can contains more than 50% post-consumer recycled aluminum.
  • In 1997 the aluminum industry paid approximately $1.03 billion to recyclers.
  • An aluminum can recycled today will be back on the grocery shelf in about 90 days!
  • Twenty years ago, it took 19 aluminum cans to make one pound, but today’s aluminum cans are lighter and it now takes 29 cans to make a pound! That means less aluminum is wasted, saving energy and other environmental resources!
  • Tossing away an aluminum can wastes as much energy as pouring out half of that can’s volume of gasoline.
  • Making aluminum cans from recycled aluminum takes 95% less energy than making cans from virgin ore.
  • 20 recycled aluminum cans can be manufactured with the energy needed to produce one can from virgin ore.
  • Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to keep a 100-watt bulb burning for almost four hours or run your television for three hours.
  • Making beverage cans from recycled aluminum cuts air pollution by about 95%.
  • More than one million tons of aluminum containers and packaging (soda cans, TV dinner trays, aluminum foil) are thrown away each year.
  • Americans throw away enough aluminum every three months to rebuild our entire commercial air fleet.
  • Last year, approximately 36 billion aluminum cans were landfilled. The cans that were thrown away had an estimated scrap value of more than $600 million.
  • It is estimated that over the past twenty years, we’ve trashed more than 11 million tons of aluminum beverage cans worth over $12 billion on today’s market.